Hairless Animals – Top 23 Hairless Animals

Today we are going to read about Images of bald guys in pop culture vary from heroic stunning to hard-done up to humorous. If it’s about the naked little wigs, do you love you,r baby? We all do. Humans can expect an amount of hair loss with age. Some surpass Mother Nature to it by shaving off all of it. There are numerous species of birds and mammals, however, we can have full feathers and furs apart obviously, from the time when they shed and shed. However, some animals break the rules of their species and become naked … and at the very least, baldheaded. We provided an assortment of hairless animals, ranging from wild naked mole rats to bears that are completely naked. We’ve added a few more — some natural nude, others not — to the famous bald bestiary.

Hairless Animals
Hairless Animals

Black Bears

When the three female spectacled bears at Leipzig Zoo in Germany began to lose their hair and show both lesions and rashes on their skin, zoologists and caretakers were at a loss. None of the males exhibited similar conditions, and the two primary causes for hair loss in bears — mange and alopecia — didn’t appear to be to blame. It’s a mystery that was never solved, but bears going bald appears to be only growing in scale and severity. An outbreak of sarcoptic mange is affecting black bears throughout the American Northeast and Mid-Atlantic, and it’s a condition that can cause not just hair loss but also a fatal autoimmune deficiency. Polar bears have similarly seen an uptick in cases of baldness-causing alopecia, and the prevailing notion seems to believe it could be a result of declining health due to climate change destroying their habitats.

Hairless Animals
Hairless Animals

Raccoons

When a strong, hairless six-pound creature was discovered in a Florida suburb, its appearance was so bizarre and unprecedented that some whispered that it might be the legendary Mexican cryptid known as a Chupacabra. Without the trademark shape, patterns, and coloration of its fur, a casual observer would likely never guess that the animal was a raccoon. And while this raccoon — dubbed Dobbie after the Harry Potter character — unfortunately didn’t survive its encounter with sarcoptic mange, a similarly bald raccoon named Gizmo recovered from its encounter and healed up after being given treatment in 2018.

Mange isn’t necessarily more common in raccoons than in other wild animals, but the fact that they often coexist on the edge of human settlements means people are more likely to encounter them than many other hairless animals. A study published as recently as 2021 indicated that the spread of mange might be facilitated by climate change since hairless animals like raccoons can survive longer in warmer weather and can thus pass the condition more easily.

Hairless Animals
Hairless Animals

Sphynx

One of the most well-known hairless animals, the hairless Sphynx cat has a surprising resemblance to the felines that decorated the tombs of Egyptian pharaohs, its origins are far less exotic and far more recent. The first sphynx was created in Canada in 1966 by breeding a domestic shorthair with a kitten that had a genetic mutation causing baldness. Though not the first hairless cat, this is the first to be bred with the explicit intent of being born without fur. Sphynxes are born without fur, but the genetic makeup of the breed can sometimes lead to cats who have a coat. While not usually kept as pets, they’re often still used for breeding diversity.

Sphynx
Sphynx

Naked Mole Rat

The fact that it’s born without fur might not be the most unusual feature of the naked mole-rat. Found throughout Somalia, Ethiopia, and Kenya, these rodents are almost completely blind and deaf, and they forage for their vegetarian meals in expansive colonies underground. These colonies can house as many as 300 of the creatures, and these communities are important because it allows them to bundle together to produce body heat — a necessity considering their lack of body hair. Like most naturally bald animals, naked mole rats aren’t entirely without fur or hair. These include whiskers for blindly navigating their underground burrows and hairs between their toes to assist with digging.

Hairless Animals
Hairless Animals

Chinese Crested Dog

The Chinese crested dog isn’t completely bald, but the tufts of hair on its feet, tail, and head only enhance the oddness of its otherwise naked body. Thanks to the recessive genetic trait that causes this condition, both furred and hairless puppies can appear within the same litter. As smaller dogs, they’re a great choice for smaller homes like apartments — and as a hairless dogs, they make sense for people who are worried about a dog causing their allergies to act up. Their fragile appearance reflects the fact that they often need caretakers with a gentle touch, but they’re personable and mischievous dogs who are known to bond tightly with just one person at the expense of everyone else.

Chinese Crested Dog
Chinese Crested Dog

Hairless Rat

In terms of speciation, hairless rats are simply a variation of fancy rat that has a genetic mutation that causes the thymus gland from properly growing. These hairless animals are born with hair, but their faulty immune systems cause them to lose it shortly after birth. While these rats are sometimes referred to as sphynx rats and intentionally bred to be used as pets — but the major health effects of their genetic deficiency make the process both difficult and ethically dubious. But researchers are finding out that these rats could reveal key knowledge into important medical research. Their lack of fur makes them ideal candidates for research into how wounds heal. Unfortunately, the health issues of this species mean that they rarely last longer than a year.

Hairless Rat
Hairless Rat

Skinny Pig

Created by scientists by breeding together haired and hairless species of Guinea pigs in 1978, the skinny pig has since become a popular pet in both Europe and North America. Since this is caused merely by a recessive gene without any notable health complications, breeding is both easier and significantly more ethical than breeding hairless rats as pets. And if you know how to care for a guinea pig, you should have to make few — if any — adjustments to your habits. Skinny pigs have the same personalities and habits as their more furry cousins, and they aren’t entirely hairless. Small patches of fur appear on their feet, legs, and noses.

Skinny Pig
Skinny Pig

Dolphin

Hair first appeared in mammals about 300 million years ago — but 30 million years ago, the descendants of dolphins retreated into the water and lost the need for hair. They aren’t the only ones either. Whales and porpoises share the same branch in the dolphin’s evolutionary tree — while the descendants of these mammals who stayed on land kept their hair and eventually evolved into hippos, cows, giraffes, and more. These underwater mammals are all known as cetaceans, and they’ve developed an extra layer of blubber to compensate for a lack of fur. It’s a natural evolution that helps control their body heat while not hindering their ability to navigate through water. Despite this, you can still see the telltale sign of hairs on the chins of newborn dolphins.

Dolphin
Dolphin

Babirusa

Current research suggests that pigs — of which the wild babirusa is a member — might be the second closest terrestrial relatives to the dolphin after hippos. But there’s no doubt that these animals lost their hairs long after their aquatic counterparts. Despite that, the reasons seem to be largely similar. It appears that they instead developed extra fat layers to better insulate them against heat, and they also roll in mud to help regulate their temperature much like other pigs. But the babirusa’s most unusual feature is its imposing tusks which have earned it the moniker of “deer-pig”. The prevailing theory is that these tusks were developed not as a weapon but as a defense to protect the face of males.

Babirusa
Babirusa

African Elephant

The frequently brutal temperatures of the African grasslands are likely the primary reason why its elephants lost their hair. The huge surface area on their tremendous bodies makes them especially prone to overheating under the direct heat of the open plains. It’s a theory that is further supported by the fact that Asian elephants have significantly more hair on their bodies to suit their more mild climates. Heat dissipation is also a reason why the ears of African elephants are significantly larger than their Asian counterparts.

African Elephant
African Elephant

Scientists have long puzzled over why African elephants still have patches of thin hair, most notably on their heads. The strategic and infrequent dispersal of these hairs has the opposite effect of a typical mammal’s fur by distributing heat evenly throughout the body and into the air rather than serving as insulation. It’s a seemingly small example of natural selection, but it can help keep these giant mammals up to 25% cooler on the acridest days.

Cetaceans

Cetaceans are the largest group of hairless mammals, made up of animals including whales, dolphins, and porpoises. This makes sense, as hair isn’t very helpful for an aquatic lifestyle. Instead, these creatures insulate themselves with a thick layer of blubber.

Cetaceans
Cetaceans

Although all cetaceans exhibit hair on their heads as fetuses, it is eventually lost. A few species are exceptions to this; one example is the bowhead whale, which has hairs on its lips, chin, and snout, and behind its blowhole.

Walrus

Hair is used as an insulator for many mammals, but walruses, like a number of other semi-aquatic mammals, have minimalized this trait and replaced it with a layer of subcutaneous fat. Walrus blubber is so thick that hair is almost entirely unnecessary, but the animal is nonetheless covered in short, reddish-brown fur. This coat is barely noticeable, however, so if it wasn’t for their characteristic whiskers, walrus’ bodies would appear completely naked

Walrus
Walrus

 

Hairless Dogs

There are a number of hairless dog breeds out there, including the Chinese crested dog, the Mexican hairless dog, the American hairless terrier, and the Peruvian hairless dog (pictured). But there are several other varieties of hairless dogs that have yet to be officially recognized.

Hairless dogs are popular pets because they are both hypoallergenic and convenient — there’s no shedding to worry about. However, their lack of hair does mean that they need sunscreen in hot weather and jackets for warmth in the cold.

Hairless Dogs
Hairless Dogs

Hippopotamus

Hippos lack hair for much the same reason that other aquatic and semi-aquatic mammals do — fat is a more useful insulator for large animals that spend most of their time in the water. This lack of hair does leave hippos vulnerable to the sun, however, so they secrete a light-absorbing substance that acts as a kind of natural sunscreen.

Interestingly, despite looking like they might be related to pigs and other even-toed ungulates, hippos are actually most closely related to modern-day cetaceans.

Hippopotamus
Hippopotamus

Hairless Horses

The first hairless horse on record was found roaming feral amongst a herd of zebra in South Africa in 1860. The horse was captured, studied, and put on exhibit. She had bright blue skin and captured the public’s adoration immediately. She soon traveled from South Africa to England where she performed in a circus, went on fox hunts, and stayed in London’s Crystal Palace.

What ultimately happened to the first known hairless horse is a mystery, but many more like her have since been discovered in other countries in both feral and domestic populations. Horses are not usually bred to be hairless on purpose, as bald horses are prone to sunburns and other skin conditions.

The most famous living hairless horse is ironically named Harry (he was named before he went completely bald). Unlike the first known hairless horse, Harry does not lack follicles. Harry was born with some fuzz and was expected to grow more hair as he aged, but instead, he lost the hair he was born with.

Hairless Horses
Hairless Horses

Hairless Guinea Pigs

Hairless guinea pigs come in two distinct varieties. The first to show up were named skinny pigs. These little darlings are furless except for small fuzzy patches on their noses and faces. Baldwin pigs, which were discovered shortly after, are completely hairless.

Many people don’t know that guinea pigs were first domesticated so that they could be eaten and still are in some countries. So if you think this hairless guinea pig looks delicious, you’re not alone.

Hairless Guinea Pigs
Hairless Guinea Pigs

Hairless Hamsters

Hairless Syrian hamsters (sometimes called alien hamsters by enthusiasts) may look shocking to some, but they have been floating around the pet population for years. The first time I saw people breeding them, they were doing so to feed them to their reptiles. Why hairless animals get stuck with this terrible job I don’t know—you’d think the furry ones would be more nutritious.

Nowadays, fur-free hamsters are more popular as pets than as feeder animals. Unfortunately, they catch chills easier than their furry relatives and therefore can send themselves into hibernation when other hamsters wouldn’t. Other than that, I haven’t heard of any particular problems with them.

Hairless Hamsters
Hairless Hamsters

Hairless Rats

Hairless rats were first bred for research in laboratories. Known as nude rats, members of the breed initially had very week immune systems which made them valuable for disease research. They are still bred and used in labs but have now become popular in the pet trade as well.

At least two genetically distinct hairless rat breeds exist, but some claim there are as many as four. All furless rat breeds are called sphynx, like the hairless cat breed, but they are also referred to simply as hairless/furless rats. While the first sphynx rats in the pet market had very poor health and often died of kidney failure early in life, breeders have since worked hard to breed more genetically diverse and viable specimens. A well-bred hairless rat from a reputable breeder should now live to about the same age as a normal rat.

Hairless Rat
Hairless Rat

Hairless Mice

Hairless mice have been used for research in laboratories for years. You may remember seeing one with a human ear growing on its back in the 1990s. They’re still used mostly for research, but they also exist in feeder and pet populations.

Hairless Mice
Hairless Mice

Hairless Bunny Rabbits

Hairless rabbits are currently being bred for meat production at Texas A&M University in Kingsville. The facility houses 50 or so individuals that are being selectively bred to create a bunny that can withstand tropical heat. The goal is to use these resistant rabbits as a food source in certain developing countries.

Furless rabbits have also been known to show up spontaneously in the pet population, but they usually die from serious health problems fairly early in life. Their exposed skin also puts them at higher risk for sunburn than furred rabbits.

Hairless Bunny Rabbits
Hairless Bunny Rabbits

Spineless Hedgehogs

This is Spud, the world’s only known spineless hedgehog, all rolled up into a ball. No one knows why he’s spineless, but he was donated to the Twiggy winkles Wildlife Hospital in the United Kingdom where he now enjoys lots of warm baths and plenty of attention from staff and visitors.

 

Spineless Hedgehogs
Spineless Hedgehogs

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